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Drivers brace for the other "Deer Season"

Drivers can curtail problems with deer simply by being aware of the animals. If you see a deer on the side of the road, the best approach is to slow down in case they bolt into the roadway. In addition, deer tend to move in groups; so drivers can anticipate that if there is one deer on the side of the road, there may be more.
Syracuse (WSYR-TV) - Spring has arrived and deer are on the move across New York – often ending up in the middle of the road and in the paths of drivers.

Most New Yorkers know that deer can do a lot of damage to their cars.

"I've actually see deer come through people's windshields and end up inside the vehicle with them,” said Sgt. Crayg Dykes of the Onondaga County Sheriff’s Office.

Drivers can expect to see deer on rural and suburban roads and highways from May through June, especially between dusk and dawn.

More than 2,000 incidents involving deer were reports on the Thruway alone in 2012.

Drivers can curtail problems with deer simply by being aware of the animals.

If you see a deer on the side of the road, the best approach is to slow down in case they bolt into the roadway.

In addition, deer tend to move in groups; so drivers can anticipate that if there is one deer on the side of the road, there may be more.


If you see a deer in the path of your car, Dykes says you should, "apply your brakes firmly, most important thing to do is not swerve. If you swerve that can cause you to lose control of your vehicle."

The exception is motorcyclists who see a deer in their path.

“If you're riding a motorcycle and a deer runs into your path you should again apply your brakes firmly and swerve, but only if it's necessary to avoid hitting the deer,” Dykes said.

If you do hit a deer, make sure you don’t approach it or touch it. Instead, call 911 to have it properly taken care of.


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