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"I Have A Dream": 50 Years Later, A Reflection on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Vision

Martin Luther King Day is a day to remember the struggle for peace and racial equality. In the current 21st century, racism has yet to be eradicated, however our nation has come a long ways.

Martin Luther King Day is a day to remember the struggle for peace and racial equality. In the current 21st century, racism has yet to be eradicated, however our nation has come a long ways.

 

Exactly 50 years ago civil rights activist, Doctor Martin Luther King Jr. helped organize the march on Washington, where on August 28, 1963 he delivered his 17-minute, “I have a Dream” speech. Calling to end racism within the United States, Doctor King spoke to 200,000 civil rights supporters who all came to listen.

 

Yesterday, on the eve of Martin Luther King Day, the first African American President of the United States got sworn into office for a second term. In a simple ceremony held in the Blue Room of the White House and only before few family members, Chief Justice John Roberts administered the oath to the 44th President.

 

In 1963, Doctor Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream that America was a land of opportunity for every individual, regardless of the color of his or her skin:

“We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we've come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.”

Perhaps, this country still has a long way to go in respects to growth and available opportunity for every individual. However, today we are closer to Doctor King’s vision for this nation than ever before, as today we celebrate Martin Luther King Day with the hope that we are that much closer to racial equality.

 

 

 

 

 

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